Map View


Area C

Area C covers a large part of the extensive East Bergholt Heath and played a significant part in the development of the settlement pattern within the parish. 


Details

The presence of the extensive East Bergholt Heath covering up to c.140ha within the northeast and east of the parish has played a significant part in the development of the settlement pattern within the parish. Historic Landscape Study of East Bergholt.

Although enclosed at the beginning of the 19th century into small fields and its sinuous tracks straightened out and rationalised into the present road system, the openness of the landscape and lack of built form within this part of the parish still reflects its medieval origins.

On first sight the number of late medieval and post medieval listed buildings appears randomly dispersed in the landscape. As shown on Figure 2.4 Historic Landscape Character (see Appendix 6) they represent the pattern of medieval and post-medieval ribbon settlement on the periphery of the former heath: starting from Burnt Oak and moving in a clockwise direction around the former heath edge these buildings include: Gandish House (21), Cottages east of Yew Tree Cottage (75), Old MillHouse (22), Gastons End, Rookery Farmhouse (48), Orchard House (66), Elm Farmhouse (89), Meadow Cottages (74), Tudor Cottage (East End) (71), Park House (30), Garden & White Horse Cottages (39) and Orvis Croft (20). This edge of former settlement is sensitive to change!!!.

The detached northern part of the modern East End is historically significant as the site of two medieval manorial sites, one on the site of Manor Farm and the other the site of Tudor Cottage. 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.